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Tuesday, January 3, 2012

Resolutions or Repentance?

Resolutions or Repentance?

By Fr. Steven C Kostoff

Christ the Savior-Holy Spirit Orthodox Church

According to the civil calendar, we began the year of our Lord (Anno Domini) 2012, on January 1. This date is based upon the calculations of a medieval monk who, in attempting to ascertain the exact date of the birth of Christ, missed the year 0 by only a few years. According to contemporary scholars, Jesus was actually born between what we consider to be 6 – 4 B. C. These were the last years of Herod the Great, for according to the Gospel of St. Matthew, Jesus was born toward the very end of Herod’s long reign (37 – 4 B.C.). Christians therefore divide the linear stretch of historical time between the era before the Incarnation; and the era after the Incarnation and the advent of the Son of God into our space-time world. In other words, the years before the Incarnation are treated as something of a “countdown” to the time-altering event of the Incarnation; and the years since are counted forward as we move toward the end of history and the coming Kingdom of God. By entering the world, Christ has transformed the meaning and goal of historical time.

Recently, there has been a scholarly shift away from this openly Christian approach to history, as the more traditional designations of B.C. and A.D. have been replaced by the more neutral and “ecumenically sensitive” designations of B.C.E. (Before the Common Era), and C.E. (Common Era). Understanding and interpreting history from a decidedly Christian perspective, I would still argue in favor of the more traditional B.C. and A.D.

Although an issue of more than passing interest, that discussion may appear somewhat academic in comparison to the pressing issues of our daily lives as they continue to unfold now in 2012. We have exchanged our conventional greetings of “Happy New Year” probably more than once in the last few days. Under closer inspection, there remains something vague about that expression, and perhaps that is for the better. Do we wish for the other person – as well as for ourselves – that nothing will go (terribly) wrong in the unknown future of the new year? More positively, do we wish that all of our desires and wishes for our lives will be fulfilled in this new year? Or, are we wishing a successful year of the perpetual pursuit of “happiness” (whatever that means) for ourselves and for our friends? At that point we just may be reaching beyond the restrictive boundaries of reality. As Tevye the Dairyman once said: “The more man plans, the harder God laughs.” Perhaps the more realistic approach would be give and receive our “Happy New Year” greetings as neighborly acknowledgement that we are “all in this together,” and that we need to mutually encourage and support one another.

We also approach the New Year as a time to commit ourselves to those annual “resolutions” that we realize will make our lives more wholesome, safe, sound, or even sane - if only we can sustain them. A resolution is to dig deep inside and find the resolve necessary to break through those (bad) habits or patterns of living that undermine either our effectiveness in daily life; jeopardize our relationships with our loved ones, our friends and our neighbors; or seriously threaten to make us less human than we can and should be. We know that we should eat less, swear less, get angry less, surf the computer less, play on our iPhones less, watch TV less and so on. We further know that we need more patience, more self-discipline, more graceful language, more attention to the needs of others, more “quality time” with our families and friends, and so on. We know, therefore, that we need to change, and we intuitively realize how difficult this is. Bad habits are hard to break. Therefore, we need this annual opportunity of a new beginning and our New Year resolutions to give us a “fighting chance” to actually change. We may joke about how quickly we break our resolutions, but beneath the surface of that joking (which covers up our disappointments and rationalizations) we are acknowledging, once again, the struggle of moving beyond and replacing our vices with virtues.

I believe that we can profoundly deepen our experience of the above. For, as a“holiday” is a more-or-less secular and water-downed version of a “holy day;” so a resolution is a more-or-less secular and water-downed version of personal repentance. To repent (Gk. metanoia) is to have a “change of mind,” together with a corresponding change in the manner of our living and a re-direction of our lives toward God. The New Year’s resolution of our secularized culture may be a persistent reminder – or the remainder of - a lost Christian worldview that realized the importance of repentance. “There is something rotten in Denmark,” and an entire industry of self-hope and self-reliance therapies – totally divorced from a theistic context - is an open acknowledgement of that reality regardless of how distant it may now be from its religious expression. As members of the Body of Christ living within the grace-filled atmosphere of the Church, we can, in turn, incorporate our resolutions within the ongoing process of repentance, which is nothing less than our vocation as human beings: “God requires us to go on repenting until our last breath” (St. Isaias of Sketis). Or, as St. Isaac of Syria teaches: “This life has been given you for repentance. Do not waste it on other things.”

Summarizing and synthesizing the Church’s traditional teaching about repentance, Archbishop Kallistos Ware has formulated a wonderfully open-ended expression of repentance that is both helpful and hopeful:

Correctly understood, repentance is not negative but positive.
It means not self-pity or remorse but conversion, the re-
centering of our whole life upon the Trinity. It is to look not
backward with regret but forward with hope – not downwards
at our own shortcomings but upward at God’s love. It is to see,
not what we have failed to be, but what by divine grace we can
now become; and it is to act upon what we see. In this sense,
repentance is not just a single act, an initial step, but a continuing
state, an attitude of heart and will that needs to be ceaselessly
renewed up to the end of life. (The Orthodox Way, p. 113-114)

Hard not be inspired and encouraged by such an expressive passage!

At Great Vespers this last Saturday evening (December 31), we incorporated into the litanies of the service some of the petitions used from a Service for the New Year. Thus, in the language of the Church, these petitions served as an ecclesial form of the resolutions we make to break through some of our dehumanizing behavior; as well as a plea to God to strengthen our better inclinations:

That He will drive away from us all soul-corrupting passions and corrupting
habits, and that He will plant in our hearts His divine fear, unto the fulfillment
of His statutes, let us pray to the Lord.

That He will renew a right spirit within us, and strengthen us in the Orthodox
Faith, and cause us to make haste in the performance of good deeds and the
Fulfillment of all His statutes, let us pray to the Lord.

That He will bless the beginning and continuance of this year with the grace of His of His love for mankind, and will grant unto us peaceful times, favorable weather and a sinless life in health and abundance, let us pray to the Lord.

If you resolve to seek and to “love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul and with all your mind … and your neighbor as yourself” (MATT. 22:37-38), then I believe that this new year may not be perpetually “happy,” but that it will truly blessed.

Fr. Steven C Kostoff
Christ the Savior-Holy Spirit Orthodox Church

Wednesday, November 2, 2011



With Tim's unceasing assistance we are switching from e-mail discussions to a forum on our church's website. Now, we can finally discuss the book uncle Shenouda made available to us - Your Guide to Confession by Hegomen Takla Azmy.

To continue the discussion we started via e-mail let us ponder upon the following question: Why do you think you should confess? The book starts in its introduction (Page 7) with four fundamental questions: Why, How, When & To Whom Should We Confess?

To get us started let us all ask ourselves "Why should I confess?" Feel free to share your thoughts and build one another with the knowledge of God.

In Christ